Stop Making Hiring Mistakes Audio Program

Are You Hitting the Bullseye on Hiring Top Talent?

We've prepared an audio program, roughly 12 minutes in length, on our Top Ten Hiring Mistakes. We recognize that some CEOs, executives, or managers might prefer to listen to this program during their commute rather than watch a video or read a blog post.

If you're interested in watching the video presentation of hiring mistakes and errors, you can find it by clicking here.

If you're interested in reading about the research project we conducted and how to improve your hiring accuracy and decision-making, click this link for the blog post.

The Top Ten Hiring Mistakes and the steps to overcome each mistake was based on research we conducted with over 100 companies, over 200 executive hires, conversations with over 20,000 CEOs and senior executives extending over a 20 year period, and a review of the academic research on hiring and interviewing over the last 40 years.

The result of all this research and the identification of the most common hiring mistakes and errors led us to write our popular and best-selling book, “You're NOT the Person I Hired.”  You can download a copy of our book on the steps to overcome the typical hiring mistakes that most managers executives not only make once – but tend to compound their hiring errors by making multiple hiring mistakes with each candidate.

We discovered through our research – both original and secondary – that the failure rate of executive and managerial hiring was above 50% – in our study it came out to be 56% – which is a staggering number.

That's 56% of all hires do not live up to the original expectations of performance. One of the questions we're fond of asking in our workshops and seminars goes like this:

 

Of all the hires you've made in your career, what percentage lived up to or exceeded your expectations in their first year of employment with you?

 

The vast majority of CEOs, executives, and managers honestly admit that if they were batting .300, they would be doing a great job – rarely do we hear that someone is batting better than .500 – is there any process in your business where you will accept that level of random variability? How about the payroll checks you write? How about the invoices you send to customers?

Absolutely NOT!

If you will not accept it anywhere else in your business, why do you accept it when it comes to making hiring decisions?

We believe most executives accept random results because:

  1. They don't what mistakes are being made
  2. They don't the steps to overcome the most common hiring mistakes

Listen to this audio program and let us in the comments to this blog post if you've ever made these mistakes. Perhaps, you'll share your most recent hiring failure with our fellow readers that was a result of making one or more of these mistakes.

Barry Deutsch

3 Sales Managers In 3 Years. Whose Fault Is It?

Q. In the last three years we have hired and fired three sales managers. The last one lasted only 3 months. They all seem to have the right experience, skills and they interview well. Once on board though they either don’t seem to deliver the sales or don’t fit. Any suggestions on how to get it right on the next go around?

This is not always due to a bad hire. I find it is often due to poor alignment of the job expectations and communications with the new sales person. It might be different in your case, but clearly something is out of alignment for this to happen three times.

Start by making sure that the expectations for the sales manager are clear, measurable, time based and in writing.  I would recommend having these laid out in 3, 6 and 9 month intervals. This allows both you and the candidate to measure progress and adjust accordingly.

Secondly, I find that when a new hire is let go in such a short period of time communications is a big issue. A candidate should never be surprised when let go. There should be regular one-on-one meetings with their boss during the first 4 months. These should be at least monthly if all is going well and possibly weekly if things need to be recalibrated.  When these regular meetings don't happen, the candidate often believes everything is going great or my boss would have told me it wasn't. So instead of fixing the problem, it continues. Then the candidate is terminated and is justifiably confused, as they thought all was well.  These meetings are a critical component of the on-boarding process and often help save a good hire from turning into a bad hire.

Join the other 10,000 CEOs, key executives and HR professionals and download a FREE copy of our best-selling book, “You’re NOT The Person I Hired.”  Just CLICK HERE  and under the FREE Hiring Resources section you can download our free eBook.

Retaining your best talent is always the best thing any company can do. Download our FREE  Non-Monetary Rewards and Recognitions Matrix. It will help you retain your best people without additional compensation. CLICK HERE to download under the Free Resources section.

I welcome your thoughts and comments.

Brad Remillard

How Small Companies Can Compete Against Larger Companies For Talent

Q. We are a small growing company. How do we compete for talent with larger companies, since we can't pay as much as they do?

In my search practice I have placed people in small and large companies. The main issue is rarely compensation. In fact, if that is the primary issue then you will never win, as there is always some company willing to pay more, and that goes for large companies too.

First off, should you even be competing against large companies for talent? Their culture, resources, support, systems and budgets often will not align with a small company. That isn't to say never, but often, so you might be searching in the wrong pool for candidates.

Secondly, especially in this economy, money isn’t everything. Candidates today are seeking much more than just compensation. The are seeking stability, work-life balance and a company where they feel they can make an impact. Smaller companies tend to have a lot less bureaucracy, there is hard work but it's a fun place to work, there is a personal touch where everyone knows everyone, it's a growing company with an exciting vision for the future and so much more. It has been my experience that smaller companies don't think about these things when hiring. They go right to compensation, when for many candidates these things have a value or trade off to compensation. Granted, there is a fair compensation for every position and person, but once that level is met other things come into play.

Finally, don't ignore the seasoned workforce. I constantly hear about how age discrimination is happening. Many of these people would be outstanding employees and bring a level of expertise no younger worker could bring and also do it for a very reasonable compensation package. This workforce is underutilized in today's market by many smaller companies.

Join the other 10,000 CEOs, key executives and HR professionals and download a FREE copy of our best-selling book, “You're NOT The Person I Hired.”  Just CLICK HERE  and you can download our free eBook under the FREE Hiring Resources section.

Retaining your best talent is always the best thing any company can do. Download our FREE  Non-Monetary Rewards and Recognitions Matrix. It will help you retain your best people without additional compensation. CLICK HERE to download under the Free Resources section.

I welcome your comments and feedback.

Brad Remillard

 

Should Human Resources Be Responsible For Hiring?

In many companies the answer to this question is, “Yes.” I believe that this is the wrong answer. HR may be accountable for  hiring and working with managers to provide candidates, but responsibility for hiring is not HR's. Especially since the vast majority of companies don't even have an HR function so what would they do if HR is responsible for hiring?

The only person in the company responsible for hiring is the CEO. They are responsible for everything that happens in the company. Remember back to management 101A in college, you can delegate authority but you can't delegate responsibility. The CEO can't delegate the responsibility for hiring in the company to HR or anyone else. Since hiring often fails, many CEOs want to blame HR, but the CEO needs to take responsibility for the failures.

If the CEO decides that their company will be known for the best quality products in the industry, what happens to quality? If the CEO decides that customer service will be the best in the industry, what happens to customer service? If the CEO decides hiring top talent is critical to the company's success, what happens with hiring?

Too often when I speak with CEOs they just accept hiring failure. They give many different reasons from we can’t afford top talent to we just can't find good people. However, they wouldn't do this for quality or customer service. The fact is companies don't have to accept poor hiring. All they need to do is the same thing they would do to improve quality or customer service; define hiring standards, develop an effective process, train people, re-enforce the standards and hold people accountable. Obviously the first three steps are the keys to successful hiring.

The CEO needs to step up and make sure that there is an effective hiring process in place and that competent and well trained people are using the process. Then hold managers and HR accountable to a standard of performance, just like they do with any process in their organization.

Hiring responsibility belongs with the CEO. Once they decide that hiring failure will not be tolerated and put a process and well trained people in place, then they can delegate the authority to HR for managing the hiring process.

Join the other 10,000 CEOs, key executives and HR professionals and download a FREE copy of our best-selling book, “You're NOT The Person I Hired.”  Just CLICK HERE for your FREE eBook.

Download this free assessment of your company's hiring process to see if your company will attract top talent. http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com/index.php/hiring-assessment-scorecard

I welcome  your thoughts and comments.

Brad Remillard

Reducing Turnover Without An HR Department

Question:  We have a lot of turnover, what would you suggest to help reduce it? We don’t have an HR department.

In our experience, turnover generally starts with a bad hire. A bad hire often starts by not properly defining the job and limited sourcing techniques that don’t bring the best candidates to you. One or both of these can result in high turnover and correcting them can dramatically reduce turnover.

Changing the job description might help. Most job descriptions are not actual job descriptions. Most are simply a laundry list of a person’s skills, experiences, required behavioral traits, and a few words about the job’s routine duties and tasks. A real job description defines the results you expect this person to deliver in order to be a top performer. We call them Success Factors. In other words, what are the factors this person needs to deliver in order to be successful? They must be measurable and time based. It isn’t about their skills and experiences, it is about how they use their skills and experiences to achieve the results you want. Defining the results you expect is the first step.

Many company’s main strategy for sourcing candidates is posting ads on the job boards. The ad tends to be a long list of demands the company wants the candidate to possess. Advertising 101A tells us that advertising is about the person you want to engage. Advertising is not about you. Few job ads are about the candidate’s motivation. Why should they get excited about coming to work for you and your company? A list of the duties and tasks they are already doing isn’t all that inspiring. When you advertise, think about what will motivate a candidate enough to reply to your ad. What will get top talent so excited that they will put together a resume just to come to work for you? Start advertising with the candidate’s motivation in mind and your pool of candidates will expand.

Join our LinkedIn Hire and Retain Top Talent Discussion Group with 3,200 participants and a vibrant discussion on everything related to job search.

Download our FREE Cost per Hire Calculator to determine the real cost of NOT hiring top talent.

If this was helpful, please pass it on to your network, post it on Facebook or to your LinkedIn Groups.

I welcome your thoughts and comments.

Brad Remillard