How To Shorten The Time It Takes To Hire

Q. We are a mid-size company that doesn’t hire that often. It seems that when we want to hire it takes a long time just to find qualified candidates. Is there a way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone?

Hiring fast rarely includes hiring the very best. The best way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone is to have a pool of qualified people available when you need them. The problem is most companies start the hiring process when they need someone. Often after one of their best people just gave notice. Companies then expect that at that exact moment in time a highly qualified candidate will also be searching, the stars will magically align and they should be able to hire this person. Wouldn’t it be nice if every time you were looking, highly qualified candidates were also looking? It just doesn’t work that way. Most hiring processes are reactive. To change your situation your hiring process must become proactive.

Highly qualified candidates don’t search based on your hiring schedule. They search based on their schedule so hiring can’t be a onetime event when you decide you are ready to hire someone. This will only provide you with the best available candidates at that moment in time. Companies that excel at hiring top talent know that hiring is a process and having a queue of qualified candidates is critical. Your hiring managers should always be on the lookout for potential people, even if your company only hires once a year. Every manager should have at least two or three potential candidates for the key positions in their department. This means that your hiring managers will have to dedicate at least some time each month to hiring. They should engage potential hires, identify who might be a potential hire, attend professional groups where these potential hires exist, respond to unsolicited resumes that have potential instead of deleting them, use LinkedIn to connect with potential candidates and follow-up with potential candidates when contacted. None of these takes a lot of time to do, maybe an hour a month. These small things can dramatically shorten the time it takes to hire someone and also increase the quality of those hires.

Join the other 10,000 CEO's, key executives, and HR professionals who have downloaded a FREE copy of our best selling book, “You're NOT The Person I Hired.” Just CLICK HERE for your FREE ebook.

Want to assess your hiring process? Download our FREE 8-Point Hiring Methodology Assessment Scorecard. How does your company rank on these critical points? CLICK HERE to download.

I welcome your thoughts and feedback. If you liked this article and found it helpful, please forward it to others.

Brad Remillard

 

What Can You Do When Hiring Isn’t Working?

Question: We have a pretty extensive interviewing process in our company. We spend a lot of time making sure the person has the right skills and experience, yet our last few hires didn’t work out. We aren’t sure what else we can do to hire people, any suggestions?

Companies often think that because they have an extensive interviewing process everything should work out. Extensive usually means that they conduct multiple interviews, review the person’s skills and experience, ask a lot of questions and the candidate meets a lot of people in the company. Unfortunately, none of these have much to do with making a good hire.

First off, skills and experience are completely irrelevant in hiring. They are important, just not relevant. You proved this by the fact that you spent a lot of time assessing the candidate’s skills and experience, yet they still failed. Why? As a hiring manager, what you care about is the candidate’s ability to apply those skills and experiences in order to achieve certain results. If they can’t then they may be a good candidate, but they aren’t the right candidate. The focus of an interview should not be on “Have you ever done X?” but rather, “How would you do X?” The first question focuses on their past. The second question requires them to explain how they will apply their skills and experiences. It is always better to ask, “How would you?” than “Have you?”

Secondly, interviewing requires competent interviewers. I would like to know if you have ever sat in and assessed others during their interviews to determine if they are even competent interviewers? So often we just assume that everyone is a great interviewer, when in fact they are not. Your interviewing process is only as good as your worst interviewer.

Join the other 10,000 CEO's, key executives, and HR professionals who have downloaded a FREE copy of our best selling book, “You're NOT The Person I Hired.” Just CLICK HERE for your FREE ebook.

Want to assess your hiring process? Download our FREE 8-Point Hiring Methodology Assessment Scorecard. How does your company rank on these critical points? CLICK HERE to download.

I welcome your thoughts and feedback. If you liked this article and found it helpful, please forward it to others.

Brad Remillard

Caution – Using Online Information To Not Hire Someone

Q:  Is there a legal problem if a company looks online, and then uses this information as part of a no-hire decision?

This is one of the hottest topics for many companies right now. Most companies are using the Internet in some form to check out candidates before they hire someone. I would suggest checking with your labor attorney to make sure you aren't violating any federal or state laws. In addition, it is becoming more important that companies protect themselves by having some social media or Internet policy.

Since this is beyond my scope I asked Laura Fleming, a labor attorney and partner with the Newport Beach law firm Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth, for her advice.

It is lawful to check publicly available, online information regarding a candidate.  However, there is a caveat.

Employers may not discriminate based on any “protected class” (race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, marital status, sex, age, sexual orientation or veteran status).  An employer's online search will likely uncover much information irrelevant to the job position, including protected class information.  Thus, if a manager does conduct Internet background searches, they must not allow irrelevant, protected class information to influence the hiring decision.

In addition, since some online data is shared only with certain parties (for example, Facebook information which is limited to friends), employers should not use deceptive or intrusive means to view such information, as this could lead to an invasion of privacy claim.

If a manager discovers publicly available information regarding a candidate, they may use such information to reject the candidate, as long as they are not making that decision because of any protected class.  For example, it is lawful to reject candidates because of inappropriate pictures or comments, or even political views that are incompatible with the employer's culture (although this may eliminate an otherwise terrific candidate).  Again, the employer must ensure that such criteria is not intertwined with any protected category.

You can explore our audio library, download free examples of compelling marketing statements, download a summary of our research project that identifies the biggest hiring mistakes, and get our culture assessment tool by clicking the links. All of these are free.

I welcome your thoughts and comments. Please forward this to your contacts on Facebook, LinkedIn, or anyone you think would benefit from this post.

Brad Remillard

You Can Shorten Your Hiring Process

Q. We are a mid-size company that doesn’t hire that often. It seems that when we want to hire it takes a long time just to find qualified candidates. Is there a way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone?

A. Hiring fast rarely includes hiring the very best. The best way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone is to have a pool of qualified people available when you need them. The problem is that most companies start the hiring process when they need someone, which often happens after one of their best people just gave notice. Companies then expect that at that exact moment in time a highly qualified candidate will also be searching, the stars will magically align and they should be able to hire this person. Wouldn’t it be nice if every time you were looking, highly qualified candidates were also looking? It just doesn’t work that way. Most hiring processes are reactive. To change your situation your hiring process must become proactive.

Highly qualified candidates don’t search based on your hiring schedule. They search based on their schedule, so hiring can’t be a one time event that happens when you decide you are ready to hire someone. This option will only provide you the best available candidates at that moment in time. Companies that excel at hiring top talent know that hiring is a process and having a queue of qualified candidates is critical. Your hiring managers should always be on the lookout for potential people, even if your company only hires once a year. Every manager should have at least two or three potential candidates for the key positions in their department. This means that your hiring managers will have to dedicate at least some time each month to hiring. They should engage potential hires, identify who might be a potential hire, attend professional groups where these potential hires exist, respond to unsolicited resumes that have potential instead of deleting them, use LinkedIn to connect with potential candidates and follow up with potential candidates when contacted. None of these takes a lot of time to do, maybe an hour a month. These small things can dramatically shorten the time it takes to hire someone and also increase the quality of those hires.

You can explore our audio library, download free examples of compelling marketing statements, download a summary of our research project that identifies the biggest hiring mistakes, and get our culture assessment tool by clicking the links. All of these are free.

I welcome your thoughts and comments. Please forward this to your contacts on Facebook, LinkedIn, or anyone you think would benefit from this article.

Brad Remillard

What Have You Done to Develop Your Team?

Are you developing a team of motivated, engaged, happy, satisfied, and stimulated direct reports?

Lack of training, development, and growth is one of the primary reasons your best talent might walk out the door on you sooner than you think!

Last week I presented to a group of CEOs who were shocked that I was suggesting they spend any time with their direct reports talking about development, training, engagement, satisfaction, intellectual stimulation, desires, hopes, and dreams. They considered that “HR Talk” and felt it would be “below” them to have to engage in a “career aspiration-type” dialogue.

I can guarantee that these CEOs are in for a rude surprise in the near future when some of the talent they depend on most – start to leave. Once a few start to leave, the rest fall like dominos, and word gets out on the street that your company (YOU)  does not develop, groom, and prepare people for bigger challenges.

 

What Does Top Talent Expect?

Are you focused on developing your team – is this idea constantly bubbling up into your thoughts, OR are you praying that since everyone shows up for work everyday, they must enjoy their job? Don’t be lulled to sleep by false impressions.

Contrary to popular opinion, just showing up does not mean contented cows, engaged employees, and satisfaction levels that are the envy of your competitors.

Top talent expects to be continuously trained. They expect to be given challenging assignments that stretch them to the next level. They want to come to work to be stimulated, intellectually turned on, pushed to excel, and forced to do their very best work to high standards.

When they are not being trained, developed, and given projects that add to their skill and knowledge level, they’ll start taking calls about other job opportunities from their friends, former business associates, and recruiters. Worst case, they’ll proactively go on-line to the major job boards and start seeking out opportunities.

 

The LIB Curve of Employee Motivation

My partner, Brad Remillard, wrote a job post, which you might title “Those Darn Recruiters”. Many companies try to impose elaborate schemes and security measures to prevent recruiters from talking to their employees. Unfortunately, Brad and I have never been able to recruit a candidate who was happy and content in their current job.

You know that a large part of being happy and content is being trained, developed, and challenged with higher level work. This is really basic Abraham Maslow concepts from decades ago. What’s surprising to me – is that most companies and executives VIOLATE on a daily basis the basic concepts of employee satisfaction, engagement, and happiness (Maslow termed a big part of that satisfaction: Self-Actualization).

If you’ve seen Brad or I present our workshop titled either “You’re NOT the Person I Hired” or “You’re the Person I want to KEEP”, then you know we use a model of employee satisfaction called the LIB Curve – which is a variation of Maslow's Self-Actualization. Feel free to check out some of our previous articles on the LIB Curve of Employee Motivation.

Basic Common Sense in Generating Smiles

Do You Inspire Others to Self-Motivate?

Why You Should Measure Self-Motivation

Here’s the key question: Do you know where every single one of your direct reports sits on the LIB curve? Are they at +8, –12, or flat-lined? If you don’t know where each one sits and where they want to be, perhaps it’s time to put your “career mentor” hat on and have a serious heart-to-heart with your direct report about their current and desired level of learning, impact, and becoming something better (LIB).

OR would it be better to wait until they come into your office and tell you they are planning on giving their 2 week notice?

When you walk in the office tomorrow, what’s the first thing you’ll start doing to develop your team?

Barry Deutsch

P.S. Download our Internet Radio Show Podcast on Non-Monetary Reward and Recognition where we discuss the internal processes required to inspire your staff to self-motivate, to engage and stimulate your top talent, and to retain your best performers.