Hiring In Another State Doesn’t Have to Be Difficult

Q. Over the next year we will be hiring a significant number of people outside of California. What are some ways to hire in other states other than running ads?

Hiring in other states will take time and commitment from the hiring manager. They must become actively involved in the process. The best people in the state where you are hiring may not be answering ads, but that doesn't mean they aren't interested in another compelling opportunity. How you search for top talent in other states really doesn't change that much from how you do it in California.

Start with LinkedIn. Begin by joining groups on LinkedIn that align with your industry and the functional area of the position. Have your hiring manager get connected with some of the people in these groups. Then search the groups for likely candidates, post the job in the groups and start sending out updates announcing the opening. These broadcasts can be very powerful. In addition, you can pay a reasonable amount of money to post an ad on LinkedIn that will target the types of people you want to attract. Finally, start engaging people who appear to fit or might know others that fit. This is easily done with emails, phone calls, or by meeting for coffee when you're in the area. None of these takes a lot of time, but they are very effective.

As your manager begins the process of building relationships, have them ask what associations and networking groups are in the area so they can tap into those resources. Ask people for referrals and contact the associations or networking group leaders. Ask if they will make an announcement or post the open position. Plan a trip or two when these groups will meet and attend them. Meet people and begin building a relationship with them. They will be your best resource for talent in the area.

The best advice I can give you is that you shouldn't wait until you need the person to start this process. Since you already know you will be hiring, start the process now so you will already have a queue of people when you are ready to hire. Top talent are out there and open to exploring opportunities. It just takes time and effort to locate them. Remember, top talent doesn't search on your schedule. They do it on their schedule. Hoping top talent will be available at the same moment in time as you are seeking them is not a very good hiring strategy.

You can now download a FREE copy of our best selling book, “You're NOT The Person I Hired.” Just CLICK HERE for your FREE ebook.

Download this free assessment of your company's hiring process to see if your company will attract top talent. http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com/index.php/hiring-assessment-scorecard

I welcome your thoughts and comments.

Brad

Technorati code ZXWMWZR7BR8Y

You Can Shorten Your Hiring Process

Q. We are a mid-size company that doesn’t hire that often. It seems that when we want to hire it takes a long time just to find qualified candidates. Is there a way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone?

A. Hiring fast rarely includes hiring the very best. The best way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone is to have a pool of qualified people available when you need them. The problem is that most companies start the hiring process when they need someone, which often happens after one of their best people just gave notice. Companies then expect that at that exact moment in time a highly qualified candidate will also be searching, the stars will magically align and they should be able to hire this person. Wouldn’t it be nice if every time you were looking, highly qualified candidates were also looking? It just doesn’t work that way. Most hiring processes are reactive. To change your situation your hiring process must become proactive.

Highly qualified candidates don’t search based on your hiring schedule. They search based on their schedule, so hiring can’t be a one time event that happens when you decide you are ready to hire someone. This option will only provide you the best available candidates at that moment in time. Companies that excel at hiring top talent know that hiring is a process and having a queue of qualified candidates is critical. Your hiring managers should always be on the lookout for potential people, even if your company only hires once a year. Every manager should have at least two or three potential candidates for the key positions in their department. This means that your hiring managers will have to dedicate at least some time each month to hiring. They should engage potential hires, identify who might be a potential hire, attend professional groups where these potential hires exist, respond to unsolicited resumes that have potential instead of deleting them, use LinkedIn to connect with potential candidates and follow up with potential candidates when contacted. None of these takes a lot of time to do, maybe an hour a month. These small things can dramatically shorten the time it takes to hire someone and also increase the quality of those hires.

You can explore our audio library, download free examples of compelling marketing statements, download a summary of our research project that identifies the biggest hiring mistakes, and get our culture assessment tool by clicking the links. All of these are free.

I welcome your thoughts and comments. Please forward this to your contacts on Facebook, LinkedIn, or anyone you think would benefit from this article.

Brad Remillard