Most Company’s Hiring Process Is Not A Process

We find that this occurs because the hiring process really isn't a process in many companies. Many hiring processes tend to be random and with incompetent, untrained people. This is not a knock on the people, it is just a fact. So why do companies expect hiring to be accurate and to attract top talent with a random or unstructured  process?

I know this sounds so obvious. Come on, who in their right mind would expect any business process to be reliable if it  produced expected results only 56% of the time.  A company wouldn't allow it. They would fix the process or shut it down. Would any company have incompetent or untrained people processing incoming checks with unstructured procedures? Lose just one check and everything stops, procedures and controls are assessed, people are retrained or fired, and the CFO personally oversees that it never happens again.

This is true with most processes except hiring. Most companies accept a high failure rate. Why any company accepts this is beyond me when this can be improved with some relatively easy fixes.

The fact is that most hiring managers have little or no training on interviewing and hiring and hence take the assistance from https://www.berkeassessment.com/solutions to find the right candidate match for their organization. Many only do it once or twice a year. So even if they have some training, by the time they hire someone they have forgotten most of the training. There are no college level courses focused on hiring. Most people learn on-the-job. One day they are an individual contributor and the next day they are promoted to a manager and told to hire their replacement. So how did this person become competent at hiring overnight?

This new hiring manager is going to hire the way they were hired. This new manager will follow the same methodology whether it is good or bad. Where do you think this person will get the interviewing questions  to ask the candidates? Generally, from the people who hired them. And where do you think the person who hired them got their interviewing questions? And so on, until we finally hit Moses.  Many hiring processes have not really changed with the times. We call this “tribal hiring.”  It is just passed down from generation to generation. But some other have changed and third parties come in to the picture, you can get Linked By Codestaff.

For any process to work it has to repeatable, be structured, have competent people, and have some measurement of accountability so when things go wrong (and they always will) one can identify the problem and fix it. In my thirty years as a recruiter and 15 years helping companies implement a structured process I have yet to find a company that does this.The fact is that this new hiring manager is not prepared for hiring.  Another fact is that people often assume that because someone has hired a lot of people, that  makes them good at hiring even though no one has validated the performance of those hires.

In fact, I have seen only a few companies that include hiring top talent as part of their performance management system. Why not hold managers accountable for poor hires the same way companies do for other poor performance? At least this would begin to establish a process where a company can identify those  managers that need training, so they can become better at  hiring.

There are at least five distinct steps to an effective hiring process. These steps have to be repeatable,  with competent people and accountability to correct and improve the process. For many companies this falls to HR. However, since the vast majority of companies don't have an HR department, then it has to fall where everything else in an organization should fall, with the CEO.

The five critical steps are:

  1. A job description that  defines the expected standards of top performance for the position. Not the standard job description that defines a person's background and lists the basic duties, tasks and responsibilities. The candidate should already know all of these. Maybe companies should ask the candidate to prepare a job description just to see if the candidate knows the job.
  2. A sophisticated sourcing plan that will attract top performers that are not actively looking for a position, but are open to a compelling opportunity.
  3. Probing interviews with competent people doing the interviewing that tests the candidate's ability to the job BEFORE you hire them. This means that the candidate must be able to explain exactly how they will deliver the performances standards defined in the job. They must detail how they will do these in your company, with your resources, within your culture and your budget, with your management style, with your customers, and with all of the the things that make your company different.
  4. There must be proper feedback or discussion of the candidate's ability to do the job  immediately after the candidate interviews. Not two days later standing in a Starbucks line while  you wait for your coffee. Not just asking the question, “What did you think of the candidate?”
  5. There must other tests, presentations,  and assessments to validate that what the candidates said they did, they actually did do and did it at the level and with the results they claimed.

These five steps are absolutely critical in every effective hiring process. Just having them isn't enough. There must be some metric that determines if the process is working and where improvement needs to occur.

Join the other 10,000 CEOs, key executives and HR professionals and download a FREE copy of our best-selling book, You’re NOT The Person I Hired. Just CLICK HERE  and under the FREE Hiring Resources section you can download our free eBook.

Retaining your best talent is always the best thing any company can do. Download our FREE Non-Monetary Rewards and Recognitions Matrix. It will help you retain your best people without additional compensation. CLICK HERE to download under the Free Resources section.

I welcome your thoughts and comments.

Brad

 

Hiring In Another State Doesn’t Have to Be Difficult

Q. Over the next year we will be hiring a significant number of people outside of California. What are some ways to hire in other states other than running ads?

Hiring in other states will take time and commitment from the hiring manager. They must become actively involved in the process. The best people in the state where you are hiring may not be answering ads, but that doesn't mean they aren't interested in another compelling opportunity. How you search for top talent in other states really doesn't change that much from how you do it in California.

Start with LinkedIn. Begin by joining groups on LinkedIn that align with your industry and the functional area of the position. Have your hiring manager get connected with some of the people in these groups. Then search the groups for likely candidates, post the job in the groups and start sending out updates announcing the opening. These broadcasts can be very powerful. In addition, you can pay a reasonable amount of money to post an ad on LinkedIn that will target the types of people you want to attract. Finally, start engaging people who appear to fit or might know others that fit. This is easily done with emails, phone calls, or by meeting for coffee when you're in the area. None of these takes a lot of time, but they are very effective.

As your manager begins the process of building relationships, have them ask what associations and networking groups are in the area so they can tap into those resources. Ask people for referrals and contact the associations or networking group leaders. Ask if they will make an announcement or post the open position. Plan a trip or two when these groups will meet and attend them. Meet people and begin building a relationship with them. They will be your best resource for talent in the area.

The best advice I can give you is that you shouldn't wait until you need the person to start this process. Since you already know you will be hiring, start the process now so you will already have a queue of people when you are ready to hire. Top talent are out there and open to exploring opportunities. It just takes time and effort to locate them. Remember, top talent doesn't search on your schedule. They do it on their schedule. Hoping top talent will be available at the same moment in time as you are seeking them is not a very good hiring strategy.

You can now download a FREE copy of our best selling book, “You're NOT The Person I Hired.” Just CLICK HERE for your FREE ebook.

Download this free assessment of your company's hiring process to see if your company will attract top talent. http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com/index.php/hiring-assessment-scorecard

I welcome your thoughts and comments.

Brad

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You Can Shorten Your Hiring Process

Q. We are a mid-size company that doesn’t hire that often. It seems that when we want to hire it takes a long time just to find qualified candidates. Is there a way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone?

A. Hiring fast rarely includes hiring the very best. The best way to shorten the time it takes to hire someone is to have a pool of qualified people available when you need them. The problem is that most companies start the hiring process when they need someone, which often happens after one of their best people just gave notice. Companies then expect that at that exact moment in time a highly qualified candidate will also be searching, the stars will magically align and they should be able to hire this person. Wouldn’t it be nice if every time you were looking, highly qualified candidates were also looking? It just doesn’t work that way. Most hiring processes are reactive. To change your situation your hiring process must become proactive.

Highly qualified candidates don’t search based on your hiring schedule. They search based on their schedule, so hiring can’t be a one time event that happens when you decide you are ready to hire someone. This option will only provide you the best available candidates at that moment in time. Companies that excel at hiring top talent know that hiring is a process and having a queue of qualified candidates is critical. Your hiring managers should always be on the lookout for potential people, even if your company only hires once a year. Every manager should have at least two or three potential candidates for the key positions in their department. This means that your hiring managers will have to dedicate at least some time each month to hiring. They should engage potential hires, identify who might be a potential hire, attend professional groups where these potential hires exist, respond to unsolicited resumes that have potential instead of deleting them, use LinkedIn to connect with potential candidates and follow up with potential candidates when contacted. None of these takes a lot of time to do, maybe an hour a month. These small things can dramatically shorten the time it takes to hire someone and also increase the quality of those hires.

You can explore our audio library, download free examples of compelling marketing statements, download a summary of our research project that identifies the biggest hiring mistakes, and get our culture assessment tool by clicking the links. All of these are free.

I welcome your thoughts and comments. Please forward this to your contacts on Facebook, LinkedIn, or anyone you think would benefit from this article.

Brad Remillard

Average Networkers Make for Average Executives

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Executive Networking

Executive and Managerial Networking can make or break your career


Effective networking can make or break your career

The most successful (top 25%) executives and managers are great networkers.

Executive and managerial networking are critical skills for success. The bad news is that so few see it as important until it is too late. The good news is that it can be taught, learned, coached, and constantly improved upon.


Signs of Mediocre Executives and Managers

Average and mediocre executives and managers downplay the importance of networking, and as a consequence they achieve less than stellar results in their career. These less than stellar results take the following form:

  • Passed over for promotion
  • Average pay increases year over year
  • Lack of job opportunities and leads presented
  • Passed over for career enhancing projects and meaningful work
  • Job searches that take 2x-3x longer than peers in the top 25%
  • Inability to stay abreast of industry changes
  • Poor hiring track record – lacking of knowing the best candidates
  • Unable to validate candidate information through references due to poor network
  • Inability to forecast/look ahead due to a lack of connections with “folks in the know”
  • Guessing at setting standards and expectations due to a lack of connections to benchmark success in comparable companies

Our Series on Executive and Managerial Networking

Networking is simple, takes very little time and nurturing when it’s done effectively and consistently. Networking is a painful experience when it is done sporadically and with little discipline.

In this series on “Networking for Executives and Managers”, we’ll take the major elements of networking at a tactical level, and break them down into manageable and actionable items you can easily implement with very little time investment.

In our next blog post, we’ll try to put a few parameters around what is executive and managerial networking so that we have a common definition.


Questions about Executive and Managerial Networking

I’m very curious if our readers could respond to a few of the questions below about networking:

When was the last time you engaged in some form of networking through your job (not including a job search)?

What has been the greatest direct benefit you ever received through a networking activity?

Have you ever recruited a great candidate for your team by networking vs. running advertisements?


Resources for Executive and Managerial Networking

Here’s a helpful link and idea until our next post. Many of our readers have expressed frustration over finding great candidates (sounds strange in the depths of one of the worst recessions since the great depression). One of the great best practices in finding top talent is to use a method of networking called One Degree of Separation.

CLICK HERE to learn more about how to find great candidates by using the networking technique of One Degree of Separation through our Success Factor Methodology.

You can also listen to our archived radio show programs on this subject and download samples of Compelling Marketing Statements to use in One Degree of Separation Networking. CLICK HERE to explore our FREE Resources Library for Hiring Executives and Managers.

Barry Deutsch

Join our HIRE and RETAIN LinkedIn Discussion Group by CLICKING HERE to learn more about executive and managerial networking strategies and techniques.